Cost of Childcare as a Percentage of Family Income

The cost of childcare for one infant and one preschooler compared to median family income

Percentage of Weekly Income Spent on Full-Time Childcare Costs

Percentage of Weekly Income Spent on Full-Time Childcare Costs

wdt_ID Year Childcare Centers Type A Homes Type B Homes
2 2010 36.50 36.50 34.48
3 2012 33.27 32.33 32.07
4 2014 51.77 49.31 40.23
5 2016 39.59 37.84 34.32

These data show what percentage of Springfield’s median family income would be spent on the 50th percentile of full-time Childcare Centers, Type A Homes, and Type B Homes.

Definitions for Childcare Centers, Type A, and Type B Homes come from the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services:

“Child Care Centers – seven or more children at one time.

Type A Home providers can care for 7-12 children at one time, however, each staff member can care for no more than six children at one time (and no more than three children under age two).

Type B Home providers can care for no more than 6 children at one time (and no more than 3 children under age 2). Children under 6 years of age related to the provider (including the provider’s own children) and residents of the home must be included in total group size.”

  • The percent of the median family income which would be needed to cover Childcare Centers and Type A Homes has gone up slightly from 2010-2016. The cost of Type B Homes has stayed the same from 2010-2016.
  • In general, Childcare centers cost slightly more than Type A Homes, while Type A Homes cost more than Type B Homes.

Data for the cost of childcare were collected from the Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services Fair Market Survey, conducted every two years. Data on median family income were obtained from the American Community Survey (ACS)’s 5-year Estimate on Median Income of Households and Families. The percentages here were found by combining the 50th percentile weekly cost of a full-time childcare center for one infant and one preschooler, divided by the weekly median family income of Springfield in those years.

Between years, Springfield (and Clark County) have changed county clusters, meaning that from year-to-year childcare costs may be compared to a different group. For example, the rise in childcare costs in 2014 and subsequent fall was at least partly due to being categorized into a different cluster.

In 2010, Childcare Centers and Type A Homes were counted together rather than separated.

This post was last updated on 15 July 2019.

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